Our Modern World

This story is the most indicative I’ve seen lately about the brave new world we’re living in – bio-tech edition…    “Finnish patient gets new jaw from own stem cells” by Sami Torma at Reuters (via BoingBoing).  The lead:

Scientists in Finland said they had replaced a 65-year-old patient’s upper jaw with a bone transplant cultivated from stem cells isolated from his own fatty tissue and grown inside his abdomen.

So does it really make sense for the U.S. to restrict stem cell research?  Not that I really know the current state of affairs – I’ve read some things that suggest that stem cells are now much more readily cultivated, so the old controversy is now moot.

Advertisements
Trackbacks are closed, but you can post a comment.

Comments

  • Jim  On February 5, 2008 at 7:08 pm

    Curt,

    The U.S. does not restrict stem cell research.

    The U.S. does not allow FEDERAL money to support EMBRYONIC stem cell research. The free market can do whatever they choose!

    We can’t debate important subjects if we don’t understand the facts.

    The story you reference is TOTALLY SUPPORTIVE of the U.S. stance – that is that stem cells from other sources than EMBRYO’S can cure many of our ills, so why should we destroy embyo’s?

    The answer is that there is lot’s on $$$ to be had by destroying EMBRYO’S, just as there is lot’s of money in destroying over one million embryo’s each year by abortion.

    It ain’t brain surgery!

  • Curt  On February 7, 2008 at 1:07 pm

    As I admitted, I’m not up on all the facts on the issue. But my sense was that the Bush policy did put some ‘chill’ on this type of research in the U.S.

    Let’s face it, a lot of this kind of cutting edge research ends up being funded by public money (only later does private enterprise get really involved to capitalize on certain discoveries that are found to be economic and marketable)… As, for instance, this Finnish work referenced, which is apparently largely funded through the University of Tampere, getting its funding from the Finnish Ministry of Education.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: